Category Archives: The Colorful Catalog

The Colorful Catalog of Chace Verity!

Welcome back to The Colorful Catalog, the LGBTQReads feature that welcomes authors of at least five works of queer fiction (beyond cis m/m) to come on the site and discuss those works with us! Today we’ve got Chace Verity, whose work (or at least covers!) you might be well familiar with by now as a reader of the site! So come check out their work and find a new fave!

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I’m Chace Verity (she/they, though “they” is preferred over “she”), and as of this writing, I’m 30. For a person who vehemently dreaded turning 30, I’ve been embracing this year and using 30 as an excuse to really explore all the queer parts of me that I’ve been avoiding my whole life. Writing has been the best road for me to take in this particular journey of self-discovery.

As a voracious consumer of media in multiple genres, I find myself branching into all kinds of worlds in my writing. Many authors I respect greatly have a distinct focus in their branding, and maybe I will get there one day when I’m no longer 30. But right now, I’m everywhere. I’m too busy figuring “me” out to worry a whole lot about what kind of platform I’m building.

(I guess I could always make business cards that say “Chace Verity: writes whatever the hell they want.”)

The Panic Before 30

Team Phison, a geeky age-gap long distance m/m contemporary romance, is the novella that I published in the last bit of 20s I had left. I wrote it when I was 28, the same age as grumpy protagonist Phil’s ball of sunshine he finds himself shockingly in love with. I put so much of myself into Tyson, more than anyone knows.

I sat on it for a year, thinking no one had any interest in a low-drama, queer take on people who meet through a video game. Then 3 months before 30 came, and I desperately wanted to say I did something with my twenties.

Everyone around me loved Phil and Tyson. People I admire tell me they reread this novella constantly. Wow, I thought. Maybe I can really be me.

But who am I?

The Rush Of Turning 30

I’ve known I was pansexual for nearly half of my life (ID’d as bi before I discovered pan). Realized I wasn’t cis maybe two years ago, while I was channeling Tyson. Felt validated after publishing Team Phison and seeing the positive feedback. Validation feels good.

Once my birthday rolled around, I started refining older works and making them even queerer before publishing them.

My heart lies in my fantasy series, The Absolutes. This is a world that’s truly for me. Queer characters! Being open and proud! In a fantasy world! If other people enjoy it, then that’s a bonus.

My Heart Is Ready is a prequel novella with f/f and m/f romantic pairings, featuring a bi heroine with secret earth magic and a queer hero who is half-harpy, half-human, and 100% into gossip. They’re exes who are best friends with some serious trust issues. Throw in a heist to steal some rare seeds, and you’ve got a serious test of friendship going on.

The first full-length novel in the Absolutes series, Your Heart Will Grow, focuses more on romance than friendship. A m/f romance with a (mostly) hetero trans soldier hero and a pansexual mermaid heroine, that stakes go up as the unlikely lovers go against a spurned prince and the possible eradication of mermaids.

Flipping back to contemporary, Just Some Things was a tiny collection of f/f shorts I put together as a freebie. It’s truly amazing to me how many people have enjoyed the weird museum cute-(re)meet, my grumpy girl with a predilection for the F word, and the college friends who have suddenly realized they’re in love.

30 isn’t scary, I realized in January. I don’t know who I am, but this number doesn’t define me.

The Calm Of 30

In my new decade, I’ve started writing really weird and queer stuff. Things without the allocishet gaze. Things I absolutely am obsessed with.

Back in February, I was really into the idea of a retelling of The Scarlet Pimpernel, but f/f and with minotaurs. And rock candy, holy moly, I love rocky candy. The Masked Minotaur came together very quickly as a novelette. It’s a unique work in that I have a version with a super explicit sex scene and a version where the sex scene fades to black. Pick your version; it’s in the same download!

My most recent release veers away from romance and focuses on friendship. The best thing I ever did for myself was find other queer people to be friends with, people who encouraged me to be myself, people who I will forever encourage to be themselves. Hard To Find is a collection of short stories with queer characters making friends with other queer characters. Half of it is contemporary, and the other half is fantasy.

I’m really in a good place now. I’m working on queer stuff and having a good time with it. I can’t wait to show you what 31 will bring. So far, there are couch hunters (enby/f main pairing), disastrous thieves (m/m), a fantasy enby/f/f tale, and more from the Absolutes involving a wishing well and pirates (m/m and m/f). I’m excited for everything beyond 31, too. You can follow me on Twitter or check out my website for all the updates of my thirties.

Will I freak out again around 39? It’s possible. But I hope I will look back at this year and remind myself everything turned out well.

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Chace Verity (she/they) is turning 31 on September 28 and ready to help anyone else feeling down over arbitrary numbers. They are publishing queer as heck stories with a strong romantic focus, although friendships and found families are important too. Chace prefers to write fantasy but dabbles in contemporary and historical fiction as well. An American citizen & Canadian permanent resident, Chace will probably never be able to call a gallon of milk a “four-liter.”

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The Colorful Catalog of…Kris Ripper!

Hi there! I’m Ripper. Please allow me to apologize for writing way to many freakin’ books.

It’s sort of like showing up for a pot luck with a van full of food. On one hand…hi, y’all, I brought some food! On the other…um, er, I have no self control AND I HAVE MADE ALL THE FOOD.

I have no self control. I write a lot of books. And I also write a lot of short stories based on readers going, “I loved it when X happened, and it’d be so cool if Y happened after that…” Three hours later I’m bashfully presenting my Facebook group, the Irregulars, with another story.

(The Irregulars have never once complained about my habit of scrawling stories and dropping them at random, mind you. I think they like it. It’s like surprise cupcakes at odd moments: here, this one’s got raspberry icing. Enjoy!)

Just to start with broad strokes: nearly everything I write is queer, and almost all of it has some elements of kink. Because I’m…queer. And I may contain…elements of kink. Er.

Ahem.

Grab and Go!

29862883In case you only have a hot second, let me start by suggesting two places to start.

Do you like kink, emotional vulnerability, and a grumpy-pants narrator? Start with Gays of Our Lives (M/M), which is the first Queers of La Vista novel. Emerson’s ornery as hell, Obie sweetly refuses to put up with his crap, and the sex is smokin’. GoOL intentionally disrupts common tropes about disabled characters in romance as frequently as possible.

Do you like intimacy, deep power dynamics, and slow-growing romance? Start with Catalysts (M/M/M), which is the first Scientific Method Universe novel. Will is young and searching and hopeful, Hugh thinks the world holds no more surprises, and Truman is just a regular dude, who had no idea he was waiting for a mercurial lover with a good friend in tow.

Pot Luck!

Let me briefly introduce you to each series. This is basically the bite-sized pizza roll version of my books. And I’m…somewhat verbose. So this should be really hilarious.

Scientific Method Universe: an exploration of love, kink, romance, and family over quite a few books. Ideal for folks who enjoy the psychological side of, well, everything, and anyone with an intimacy kink. (Pairings include M/M/M, NB/M, M/F.)

Queers of La Vista: all the queer community, a lot of romance, and a little bit of murder. Ideal for folks who enjoy getting to know a group of characters well and watching them fall in love. (Pairings include: M/M, F/F, transM/cisF, M/M/M. Also includes a trans teenager.)

25116938New Halliday: a small town, and a lot of kinky fellas falling for other fellas. Ideal for folks who love M/M romance, and anyone who’s into food. This series will make you crave grilled onions (if you’re into that sort of thing). (M/M. Also includes a parent with a trans kid.)

The Home Series: an alternate universe exploring themes of power dynamics and politics. Ideal for anyone who’s read a master/slave fic and gone, Ewwww. Also, all about chosen family and reclaiming personal narratives. (Pairings include M/M, transM/cisF, M/F/F.)

And for dessert…

Little Red and the Big Bad: a blisteringly hot look at a kinky one-off that builds and deepens until two guys find themselves in a damn serious relationship. Ideal for folks who need a book to take back to their bunk. *hint, hint* (M/M.)

Leftovers!

Now that we’ve feasted, I’ll wrap you up some leftovers to carry home. For something poly and playful, do feel free to enjoy my longish novella The Spinner, the Shepherd, and the Leading Man (M/M/M) from the New Halliday series, which you can download from my site. For something with a sharper edge, please take a peek at the short story “Seen” (NB/M).

And for a far more complete idea of my books, definitely check out this shiny list: http://krisripper.com/blog/all-the-books/

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ripperpicturemediumKris Ripper lives in the great state of California and hails from the San Francisco Bay Area. Kris shares a converted garage with a toddler, can do two pull-ups in a row, and can write backwards. (No, really.) Kris is genderqueer and prefers the z-based pronouns because they’re freaking sweet. Ze has been writing fiction since ze learned how to write, and boring zir stuffed animals with stories long before that.

The Colorful Catalog of…Shira Glassman!

Hello and welcome to The Colorful Catalog, which focuses on authors who’ve got at least five published LGBTQIAP+ books (including novellas) and gives you an overview of everything they’ve got, as provided by the authors themselves! Hopefully you can find at least one book that screams “I NEED THAT!” from any given catalog, and from there, if you love it, ta da! Instant access to info on where to go next.

I’m delighted to showcase the colorful catalog of Shira Glassman, queer indie rec-er extraordinaire and seriously prolific authoress of all things LGBTQAP. As a bonus, you get to stock up on a whole bunch of Jewish queer lit right before Rosh Hashana! Everybody wins!

Hi! I’m Shira Glassman, and today I’m going to play for you the first movement of the sonata for unaccompanied violin by Arthur Honegger—

Wait, sorry, wrong opening line! I’m sure most of you know me, if you know me at all, from my fantasy series, but since this is a backlist guide: did you know I’ve written two contemporary romance novellas, too? The theme of both is borrowed from my orchestral life. Fearless is about a band mom who falls for an orchestra teacher while everyone is snowed in at All-State, a cute butch lady who might just get her to pick up the violin again after a twenty-year lapse. Lioness in Blue is about the bi girl who sits second oboe, whose flirtation with the hot, beardy older man who sits first oboe finally leads to affirming, mildly femdom-y sex.

Now that I’ve satisfied the people who aren’t interested in SFF: on to The Mangoverse! My series originally started as a combination of three needs: a way to cope with the unexpected loss of my father, a lifelong hunger for f/f princess fairytales (when I was A Tiny we didn’t have K.S. Trenten’s Fairest or Audrey Colthurst’s Of Fire and Stars), and wanting to see love instead of conflict between The Hero and The Dragon—which is relatively easy to find nowadays, but not so much in the 80’s. Every book in the series was written to stand alone, and just be separate but sequential adventures about the same characters, but I have no idea if I succeeded at that so you may want to read reviews.

Another important note is that the main character has problems digesting gluten and some of the proteins found in poultry, and her chief romance is with a palace cook who becomes her personal chef as well as her partner.

The first in the series is The Second Mango (hey, kids, never put the word “second” in the first book in a series. Whoops!) in which a nerdy lesbian named Shulamit inherits her father’s throne suddenly at a far too young and sheltered age to know How to Queen. By the end of the book she’s started to figure her shit out, and has acquired a nice solid Found Family to cherish, including a bi girlfriend. The focus of the book is on solidifying her friendship with her new hetero demi bodyguard Rivka while they ride around having adventures. Rivka’s got a significant romantic arc in the book, too, if you’re looking for demi m/f.

Climbing the Date Palm picks up three years later, where Kaveh, a “bi prince from next door” begs Queen Shulamit for help rescuing his labor activist boyfriend Farzin from a trumped-up treason charge. Apparently King Jahandar didn’t like it when his son fell in love with the guy who stood up to him about wage theft. Oops! Shulamit is determined to find a way to help that won’t involve war, even though Rivka is chomping at the bit. This one includes a poly aromantic cat-shifter and is based on real local events in my home county, in which activist friends of mine fought to establish an ordinance that since its inception (around the time I wrote the book) has recovered around 45 thousand dollars in stolen wages from employers.

A Harvest of Ripe Figs shows Shulamit solving mysteries in her capital city as part of her royal obligation toward justice, while she and her partner Aviva raise the baby princess. A celebrity violinist’s instrument is stolen just after her performance, and it quickly turns into a more general security problem as Shulamit comes to realize illegal magic may have been used to disguise the theft.

The Olive Conspiracy just came out this summer. Shulamit uncovers an international plot to tank her country’s economy by sabotaging their agriculture, their main source of strength. What’s worse, the beautiful straight foreign princess she crushed on as a teenager might be behind it. This one features a new lesbian couple—some farmers she helps when they’re about to lose everything—and a heroic elderly trans woman. I had a good time contrasting Shulamit’s healthy, loving relationship with her partner as an adult with the intensity and one-sided torture of her crush at sixteen. The book has adventure, lots of dragon screen-time, three bi characters, three lesbians, and a rescue kitten.

There are also short stories! If you buy Figs and Olives in paperback, you’ll get all the short stories included, but if you buy the eBooks, the short stories are included separately in a volume called Tales from Perach. There are seven of them all together, and they give some of the supporting characters (like the lesbian farmers or the trans woman chef) an opportunity to take center stage, or recount one of Rivka’s adventures on the road with only her dragon companion before Shulamit hired her. (Rivka’s story features her rescuing an aro ace “damsel in distress”, so if that’s special to you, don’t miss “Rivka in Port Saltspray.”)

As a final note at the end, veering away from Mangoverse again, I do have some erotic shorts available online. “Eitan’s Chord” is a Chanukah fairy threesome, about magic to bless a young, impoverished trans m/cis f couple one winter. “Wet Nails“—ignore the cover; it was part of an anthology and I can’t control that for now—is paranormal sex between two bi women, a lonely grad student and the ghost of her favorite glamorous 1950’s Hollywood actress. “Treasure Hunt” is about two guards who get sent into a dragon’s cave to steal treasure. They doubt the dragon’s existence and use the opportunity to eat lunch and fool around, but the dragon…. is watching.

All of the above focus on Jewish characters and often have holidays and other rituals woven into the text. Mine are worlds where religion and the queer soul are completely compatible—with a note to my non-religious readers that with the exception of some of the Tales from Perach shorts, the Jewishness is more focused on the secular culture than the religion itself. My warrior woman Rivka’s native language is Yiddish, for example.

My one published work so far that doesn’t include anything Jewish is my anti-biphobia short “The Artist and the Devil,” about an art teacher who becomes increasingly suspicious that his businessman crush is actually Satan. I’ll leave it up to you to read and figure out if it counts as contemporary romance or paranormal, because categorizing it under those conditions would be a spoiler! 😉

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04171518461

Shira Glassman is a violinist living in Florida with a very good human and a very bad cat. She is best known for writing fluffy queer fantasy that draws inspiration from her tropical upbringing, Jewish heritage and present life, and French and German operas. She believes that we need infinite princess, dragon, and superhero stories for all the demographics who never got to play those roles when she was little; some of the ones she’s written have made it to the finals of the Bi Book Awards and Golden Crown Literary Society awards. Her latest is The Olive Conspiracy, about a queen and her found-family saving their country’s agriculture from a foreign plot.

The Colorful Catalog of…Matthew J. Metzger!

Hello and welcome to The Colorful Catalog, a brand-new feature on LGBTQ Reads that focuses on authors who’ve got at least five published LGBTQIAP+ books (including novellas) and gives you an overview of everything they’ve got, as provided by the authors themselves! Hopefully you can find at least one book that screams “I NEED THAT!” from any given catalog, and from there, if you love it, ta da! Instant access to info on where to go next.

I’m psyched to kick this off with the fantastic Matthew J. Metzger, whose Spy Stuff will hopefully have arrived at my door by the time this posts, and whose newest release, What It Looks Like, just released on Saturday! But I’ll let him tell you more about that, and everything else!

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Hi, I’m new here.

Only I’m not.

Sort of.

I signed my first publishing contract in 2012. Since then, there’s been over ten novels, a smattering of short stories, and three publishing houses. I write contemporary queer romance, both adult and young adult, and the pile of incomplete manuscripts and unwritten ideas is taller than me.

(Admittedly, I’m five foot three, so that’s not actually that tall, but still.)

Every one of these books is different. Wildly different. And I didn’t quite realise that until I found myself with a new boyfriend (don’t ask) who wanted to know where he ought to start with the backlist.

“Uh,” I said. “Well. I suppose that depends what you’re in the mood for.”

It really does.

Genre wise, I’m a one-trick pony. Adult or young adult, contemporary romance, queer. That’s it. Those are my areas. But within that? Within that, I’ve nearly got a book for every emotion.

28365577He decided he wanted something that had a bit of a ‘fuck you!’ attitude to jerks. The Italian Word for Kisses, I told him. Two boys dealing with a homophobic new kid at school, and in a real working class Sheffield fashion: punch him in the face until he gets the idea and leaves you alone.

But then, if you want a more threatening bad guy, and something to keep your chest locked up tight until the very end, then Thicker Than Bone will have you wanting to murder Tony yourself, just to bail the heroes out. Tony has swastikas tattooed on his hands…and his younger brother’s boyfriend is an Iraqi. Tension is an understatement.

And then there’s the emotional stuff. Most of my work doesn’t have bad guys. Private was deliberately written without one. Shane’s terrified to come out to his military family, but it’s not actually anybody’s fault. It’s just the culture he’s been raised with, and it’s assumptions and jumping to conclusions on both sides that fuel the issue.

What It Looks Like follows a similar pattern, but in reverse. Instead of everyone doing everything right and it still not quite working, What It Looks Like is an entire cast handling a situation wrong. Nobody in this book is what they seem, and so it makes perfect sense for Eli’s parents to disapprove of his new relationship with Rob. Especially as Eli’s parents are police officers, and Rob is a fresh-out-of-prison drug dealer with a history of violence. Are they going about it the wrong way? Yes. But so are both Eli and Rob themselves. Everyone’s to blame here, as opposed to no one. (Helena summed it up better than I can.)

The height of the emotional novels are the Vivaldi in the Dark books. Darren suffers from serious depression throughout the seven years covered by the trilogy, and even I struggle to re-read the second book. This is an exploration of life with a heckuva nasty illness, and it’s painful. Although one of my earlier projects, this one still haunts me.

29775399Spy Stuff crosses the bridge between heavy emotion, and light-hearted fun. Most of the book is the simple first-relationship wobbles that everybody goes through…with an added layer of complexity, as one of the boys involved is transgender, unbeknownst to his new boyfriend. (This was actually where my boyfriend found me, as we’re both trans ourselves. He also hasn’t stopped flailing about this book yet.)

Then there’s the other side of that angst-humour bridge. The Suicidal Peanut. Oh, this book. It’s my guilty pleasure. One of my favourites, even though it’s nothing more than an experiment in writing voice, and an adorkable hero. It’s not complicated. It’s not packed with feels. It’s not a must-be-told story. It’s just a dorky kid with a big crush. It’s a laugh. Mindless, even. But God, I love it.

But what every one of them has in common is some link back to me. Some part of them is part of me. From the streets Tav and Luca roam in The Italian Word for Kisses having been my own streets for five years, to Eli’s bitter regard of his family’s inability to accept his gender identity in What It Looks Like, all of these books come back to me in one way or another.

But in far more ways than a simple queer author = queer books formula.

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Matthew J. Metzger is an asexual, transgender author of queer contemporary romance. Dragged up in the wet and windy British Isles, he combines a punishing writing schedule with a gruelling day job and, as a result, has no discernible life beyond the gym, his overweight cat, and his first-name-terms relationship with the local pizza delivery guy. He can be hunted down mainly on Facebook and Twitter, or at his website.