Tag Archives: m/m

6 New July eBooks for Under $5!

So Forward by Mina V. Esguerra (bi m/f contemporary romance, $1.99)

Things Hoped For by Chencia C. Higgins (f/f contemporary romance, $2.99)

Set the Stage by Daniel De Lorne (m/m contemporary romance, $3.99)

The Care and Feeding of Waspish Widows by Olivia Waite (f/f historical romance, $3.99)

Trouble & Strife by Lara Kinsey (bi m/f historical romance, $3.99)

Hairpin Curves by Elia Winters (Contemporary f/f Romance, $4.99)

Links are Amazon affiliate. Using them helps earn a small percentage of income for the site, so please do!

4 New June eBooks for Under $5!

Two Rogues Make a Right by Cat Sebastian (m/m historical romance, $3.99)

Just Like That by Cole McCade (m/m contemporary romance, $4.99)

Her Lady’s Honor by Renée Dahlia (f/f historical romance, $4.99)

Freedom by E. Davies (trans m/cis m contemporary romance, $4.99)

Links are Amazon affiliate, which earn a small percentage for the site with each purchase.

Trans Embodiment: Sexuality in Cis/Trans M/M Romance, a Guest Post by Freedom Author E. Davies

One of the most popular requests on the LGBTQReads Tumblr is for recommendations for m/m trans Romance, and I’m so thrilled to have an author of the world’s newest here to talk about it, and specifically about sexuality in it. Freedom by E. Davies releases today, so let’s take a look at the book and then get right into the author’s guest post!

Life doesn’t come with an instruction manual. But Henry’s junk does.

Agoraphobe Jaden shouldn’t have let his big brother put a ticket in a blind date raffle for him. He wasn’t expecting to win. And certainly not an overnight trip to the Grand Canyon with a gorgeous stranger—and his total opposite, a hunky wilderness guide.

Henry’s excited to meet a guy he clicks with, having finally finished bottom surgery. He’s been living stealth as the man he is for years, but he’s growing tired of hiding his past. Jaden not only accepts him, he captivates Henry, who resolves to be courageous and vulnerable in the rest of his life.

Back home in Denver, Henry starts to take pride in reconnecting with the trans community, while Jaden pushes himself out of his comfort zone. But freedom always comes at a price. Can they take the plunge into their wide open future together?

Buy it: Amazon 

And here’s the post!

Transition is most visibly about embodiment—but it goes so much further than this simplified explanation. In seeking a better way of physically being, we’re also embarking on a journey of hope. Transition has forced me to believe in who I can be, and to strive to embrace that potential joy, even when those around me didn’t understand; that process has been the most powerful, life-affirming experience of my life.

I’ve been on this journey for over eight years now. A lot has changed, to say the least. And yet, despite massive increases in visibility and public awareness, and the associated risks and opportunities, the progress is uneven. Visibility rarely means education, and it’s hard to find facts on many aspects of transition and trans life. One of those areas is bottom surgery options for trans men, and another is trans men’s sexuality. Where those areas intersect, it’s often impossible to find facts without seeking out one-on-one conversations—which is not always possible or practical.

This is obviously aggravated by the current campaigns to stigmatize trans men’s surgeries. The abuse associated with trans bodies leads to many of us talking only behind closed doors—which is what transphobic factions want, so that they can control the conversation… and in doing so, our very hopes and dreams. Even when you do encounter information, it tends to be dry surgical factsheets that don’t really relate to everyday life. What will it feel like to actually interact with this different body in sex, while getting dressed, or in the bath? These questions tend to get overlooked in favor of the important decisions on surgeons, optimal healing, and so on. When you’re caught up in the required treadmill of waiting, chasing referrals, fighting for your rights, preparing for outcomes, and more, it’s hard to imagine the minutia of the “after”.

That’s where fiction can come in.

For cis authors, trans lives are often most interesting at their most raw: coming out, starting hormones, getting top surgery. But the focus on trans men in earlier stages of their journeys, the comparatively more easily-available information, and persistent myths and stigmas around gay trans men’s sexuality, means that romance featuring trans men tends to place them before or without bottom surgery.

When I started writing trans characters in MM romance, the questions I strove to answer in my fiction were much like those in the rest of my life: What does trans life actually look like after the moments that tend to be in the spotlight?

In answer, I’ve worked to create stories with a variety of trans men: James in Grind is struggling with debt from top surgery and has no interest in the further surgeries currently available, but packs and enjoys frot; Nic in Flaunt has had meta and is both ready to reembrace his femininity, and exploring his options for phallo now; Jake in Forever is boldly toppy, and would like a hysterectomy but wants to bear a child first. Each character tends to subvert some readers’ expectations, and each reflects an equally valid trans life.

In Freedom, I finally wrote a trans character who is post-phallo (all stages), having dated men before and during transition, but who hasn’t hooked up since then. He also has a complicated relationship with transness, having lived stealth for some years and found it liberating at first, only to feel like it began to encroach upon his freedom instead.

The conversations I wrote in Freedom came from a place of wanting to explore this different possible relationship to transness—post-dysphoria, if you like. Post-transition as a concept seems wobblier than it did when I started writing the book, and when I set out on this surgical journey myself. Nowadays, I think my relationship to myself, my past, and my community will keep on evolving for many years to come.

Throughout all my stories, I hope to show that transition is an ongoing process and series of choices, and there is no one-size-fits-all narrative. Above all, I want trans readers to see that romance can find you at any point in this journey; that they—and we—are loveable and loved no matter what. We can be as open and out or as stealth and private as we wish. Trans men are not an obscure fetish, nor are we desired only post-transition, or only desired by certain sexualities or genders, or any of the other myths. I tend to write pairings of cis gay men and trans gay men, simply because they’ve been the most common in my life experience. Even this fact often surprises people! Plenty of cis gay men do date, fuck, love, befriend, and desire trans men. If that simple fact can’t make it to any broader cultural awareness, there’s certainly an uphill battle about the complicated choices we make regarding our bodies.

When I was preparing for lower surgery, the vast majority of people in my life had no idea what was involved, what the options were, or even that it was possible to have a real, satisfying sex life—either before or after surgery! In particular, cis gay culture at the moment seems to have very little idea how to address our existence, and gay fiction often reflects that confusion and uncertainty. Yet trans men have been dating cis gay men (as well as people of all genders and sexualities) for as long as people have been around! Within broader society, there’s very few portrayals of our bodies, whether we opt for bottom surgery or not.

There seems to be an odd dichotomy of thought: either we must desperately desire surgery (leaving no space for those who are happy without it), or we must reject it, as “natural bottoms” (a deeply transphobic concept that is startlingly pervasive). If we do choose surgery, either it’s “the surgery” that grants us, overnight, a cis penis—a misunderstanding that can create painfully dysphoric interactions with friends and lovers. Or, on the other hand, we’re doomed to life with no satisfactory options.

Where’s the room for reality: that our options are broad, our outcomes not always certain but certainly not hopeless, and our lives not necessarily centered on this one narrow aspect of our selves? That the results can be more than satisfactory, and huge strides in techniques have been made, yet outdated myths tend to circulate more widely than fact? That despite this, there are huge strides in advocacy, information, and aftercare that must be made to protect and uplift us?

Better still, where’s the room for fantasy: that we can set aside all our reality for an afternoon and just enjoy a story? That we can have a perfectly wonderful sex life where the differences between our junk and the expectations placed on cis guy’s are minimal, or even celebrated? This is what was so deeply enjoyable about writing Freedom—having Jaden simply accept Henry’s body, embrace the advantages, and focus on learning what makes Henry, specifically, feel good. It’s not a fantasy that’s so far away from real life. In my experience, that’s how relationships tend to work, yet we often aren’t granted this fantasy on the page. Sensual moments are often used for predictable narrative tension, as if we can’t simply exist, fuck, and love it.

Not that there isn’t a place for those stories—trans lives are messy, real, and diverse. Even within Freedom, with my optimistic outlook and aims, there are moments where Henry struggles to remember that his learned habits about his body are outdated now.

Romance books are a tremendous place to explore how our many lives and loves can look. The diversity in trans bodies and lack of education regarding them can throw off readers sometimes. But that very lack of expectation is also an opportunity! Because no person should be expected to enjoy or desire sex, to fit naturally into any role, or to be interested in any particular sex act, gender, or person. Yet too many norms of society are structured around these rigid, artificial ideals.

In rewriting the rules of expectation, trans people can show a path to sexual liberation for all. At the end of the day, sex—between fictional characters or in real life—ought to be about finding what each person involved desires, and looking for the points of intersection where both (or more) can find what they want and need.

One thing’s for certain: sex, sexuality, and transness isn’t neat and tidy, but it is full of hope and possibility. And that’s something that will never grow old.

***

Since 2013, E. Davies has crafted feel-good stories of men in love–stories that are brimming with hope, found families, and realistic guys next door getting their modern fairytale endings. As for hobbies: rescuing bees, dancing badly, traipsing through meadows, and studying photos of cute guys for research totally count, right?

New May eBooks Under $5!

Slippery Creatures by KJ Charles (m/m historical romance, $3.99)

Starcrossed by Allie Therin (m/m historical fantasy romance, $4.99)

The Girl Next Door by Chelsea M. Cameron (f/f contemporary romance, $4.99)

Meet Cute Club by Jack Harbon (m/m contemporary romance, $4.99)

Authors in Conversation: L.C. Rosen and Cale Dietrich

I’m so excited to have two of my favorite gay YA sophomores on the site today, chatting about their newest books! Lev Rosen is the author of Jack of Hearts (and other parts) and Camp, the latter of which released this past Tuesday (along with Jack‘s redesigned paperback), and Cale Dietrich is the author of The Love Interest and the upcoming The Friend Scheme, which releases on July 28! Make sure to check out all four of those titles, and to read on below for their conversation about the books, toxic masculinity, internalized homophobia, and more:

Lev: Hi Cale!  I’m so excited to talk to you about your forthcoming novel, The Friend Scheme, and my new novel, Camp, which came out on Tuesday.  I really loved your last book The Love Interest, so getting to read The Friend Scheme was very exciting! And I love the setup – closeted son of a mafia family falls for a guy who he knows is the son of the rival mafia family who may be seducing him to destroy his family.  Love, lust, trust, betrayal, family loyalty.  Who could say no to all that?  But let’s get this out of the way: There’s a minor character named Lev in The Friend Scheme, and he’s a shmuck.  Should I be deeply insulted or merely offended?

Cale: Hi Lev! First up: DEEPLY OFFENDED. Obviously. Just kidding, that schmuck Lev has nothing to do with you, because I adore you. Jack and Camp are two of my all time favourite-YA books, they’re so smart and really explore the modern queer identity while being fun and romantic. I love them. I’m so happy I get to talk to you about Camp! One of the things I loved most about it was its exploration of masculinity, and the complicated relationship it has with being queer. Was this something you’d always wanted to explore in a novel, or did something inspire you?

Lev: WELL! I shall be deeply offended then.  Let me get out my burn book…

And yeah, Camp is so much about navigating patriarchal gender nonsense as a queer man, and how somehow, even when we’re out and proud, that straight mindset can creep in and cause a lot of pain.  But the original inspiration was actually old Doris Day/Rock Hudson 60s screwball sex comedies.  And, if I’m being honest, the post-modern redo of those movies, Down With Love.  That was the big inspiration – I wanted a contemporary queer YA version of those movies, because I love those movies. I love Down With Love.  But of course, those movies center around the idea of “the battle of the sexes” – very 60s.  And making that queer wasn’t going to work quite right, until I realized it could be battle of the masc/femme.  And once that occurred to me, everything fell into place – masc4masc stuff, the summer camp setting.  I always love exploring post-coming out stuff, though, so I imagine something would have snuck in there eventually.  I just knew it needed to be in a queer space to work.  If you’re out in the world with this, straight people are going to seriously interfere and try to tell you that masc gays are better, or femme gays are more fabulous, really try to put you in a category.  In an entirely queer space, the characters can play with these ideas of gender performance and it can be seen as just exploring identity.  Straight people seldom let queer kids do that.  And queer community was so interesting to me in your book, The Friend Scheme, as well, because it’s Matt’s lack of queer community that really kind of puts him in this impossible situation – he’s closeted and has no queer friends, so the first one that comes along becomes his everything, his entire community, and he has to rely on that one person so much that it becomes dangerous.  I was wondering if that was intentional?  Like, did you go into this wanting to show the dangers of being an isolated queer person?

Cale: AHHH. I wonder who else is in that burn book!

INTERESTING. You mention that the straights in relation to saying masc gays are better, or femme gays are more fabulous etc, but what do you think about the pressures of being masculine coming from within the gay community itself? To me it feels like there is a lot of pressure on social media and the like within the gay world to live up to a certain standard of masculinity, (which is really rubbish). I understood why Randy decided to act more masc to attract Hudson – scroll Instagram and you’ll see a specific type of gay sexuality continually heralded as the most attractive – the buff, masc gym gay. I’m just wondering where you think the pressure on gay guys to be masculine is coming from — is it from straight people, or is it from other gay men?

As for TFS and Matt being isolated, absolutely! I think we were both trying to explore queer masculinity in two different ways, which I think is so great and I’m so bummed we no longer share a release date so we could be a double feature! To me, Matt’s whole story is about him not living up to the kind of man his father wants him to be, and a lot of that has to be with his masculinity. As much as he tries to push himself into the guy that his family set out for him, he only really finds happiness once he starts accepting he isn’t the kind of guy his dad wants him to be. I was trying to explore that feeling through a genre story. And to answer your question: it was intentional! I did want to show how that lack of support and community can be incredibly painful, especially when you’re cut off from them by being closeted. I ratcheted things up to fit the genre, but mostly I was trying to explore how that feels. I don’t want to spoil anything but hopefully the epilogue shows how things can improve once you’ve found a queer community!

Lev: The Burn Book is large and long. Top of the list right now is whoever is responsible for the pre-9AM jackhammering directly outside my window during all this social distancing.  They are a terrible human being.

And yeah, Camp deals with that internalized homophobia, too, the way the community can essentially take part in that! But I think that problem isn’t exactly exclusive to the gay community.  It’s a problem of patriarchy and toxic masculinity – being queer doesn’t save you from that.  It can even make it worse; when Hudson starts to explore why he values masculinity so much, it comes out that it’s a form of protection.  A lot of “masc4masc” guys think it makes them better because it makes them pass as straight, it makes them acceptable to straight people – which is something I don’t think queer people need to be worrying about.  Because while being queer doesn’t save you from the patriarchy, it gives you an opportunity to sidestep it.  Being gay is a gift.  When you come out, you have a chance to step aside from all that nonsense and look at patriarchy and say “okay, so I’m not into ladies like they want me to be, which makes me less of a man, supposedly, but… what if all those ideas were nonsense?  What if everything is meaningless and behaviors we attribute to genders are made up?  What if I get to be whatever I want, and fuck gender conforming?”  Being given that opportunity – and I genuinely think its a lot harder for straight people to be given it – is a gift.  Sadly, its not one a lot of gay people unwrap because coming out is so traumatic for them that they cling to the patriarchy even harder than straight people do, hoping it will make them not actually straight again (well, probably some of them), but make them essentially “count as” straight in the eyes of society.  And that sucks so hard for them.  There’s nothing wrong with being “masc-acting” and queer (in Camp, Brad fills that role, that’s just who he is, there’s no performance).  But to be trapped feeling like you have to be masc acting, like it effects your value as a human being?  That’s awful.  So I actually feel sorry for those guys on instagram.  I mean, I have no problem with a guy who’s built and bearded or whatever (I, myself am bearded, and I DO have a build).  But a guy who says he’s “manly” or “masc” – that’s where it gets sad for me.  And those guys being more praised for their masculinity by the community makes me sad, too.  Like… we were all given this gift guys.  Unwrap it.

And yes! Friend Scheme is all about a very old school, very blunt form of masculinity.  I keep thinking “murder is masculine,” so you should see if that can be the tagline of your novel.  I think, in fact, Matt’s whole story is about having that gay gift I talk about – his queerness is what allows him to see himself outside this mold they try to put him in, this future they want for him.  And I love how you somehow manage to combine that exciting mafioso action with what is essentially a really sweet romance.  You did it in The Love Interest, too.  And they’re both about how these guys know they’re not who they’re supposed to be and fall for a guy who they know they can’t trust.  It makes me think about dating in the closet, how you want to be with this person but also by being with them you’re kind of giving them the power to destroy your life.  Is that why that theme comes up for you?  Do you think dating as a queer person is more fraught with issues of distrust?

Cale: This is such a good answer!!! I agree with everything you say. It’s such a complicated issue, and I’m so happy that you explore it in Camp, as I think it’s a question that’s extremely relevant to modern queer people. I’m such a fan of yours!! Ah!

Omgosh,  “murder is masculine,” is the perfect tagline for TFS! I love it! And I totally agree about Matt having the gay gift that you talk about – it is 100% what I was going for! I wanted to explore exactly what you talk about in your answer — I feel like being queer does force you to have these sorts of conversations with yourself, and makes you see yourself outside of the mold people try to put you in. That leads to a lot of questioning and growth. As for the danger of dating in the closet – that has appealed to me as it just made sense for the characters and the stories I was trying to tell – it definitely adds a layer of distrust and danger and that’s what my books are sort of built on! But my book three hero is out and proud, so I think I’ve explored closeted characters as much as I would like to (for a while, anyway).

I’m really curious, what would be your response to someone who says that they have a preference for masc guys?

Lev: I mean, I think I’d say that’s fine.  Randy clearly is into Hudson is who is masc… but I think it’s also worth interrogating your own desires.  Some people are like “that’s my type, tee-hee, don’t need to think about it,” but if your type is hyper-specific, it worth taking a moment to wonder why.  Are you attracted to guys like that because society has always told you to be?  Because they represent something you want to be?  Because you think being seen with them in public, or by your parents, is what will make people accept you?  Is your lust determined by societal approval?  Lust isn’t just lizard-brain.  Or it can be, but then it gets tempered.  I think a lot of about guys who are into plus size women, but never ever admit it.  It’s a different issue and I’m not the one to talk about it, but it’s something that happens a lot and at least part of the reason why has to do with societal pressure to punish women for being fat.  Likewise, there’s a lot of societal pressure to punish gay men for not being a certain way.  And sometimes that effects desire.  So if you’re into muscles cause you’re into muscles, cool.  But if you’re into “straight-acting” guys, or even just full on straight guys (and many of us have been at some point), ask yourself why.  Why do you want someone you know will never want you?  Why do you want someone who represents something you’ll never be but which culture is constantly telling you to be? And this can be applied to more than just “masc.”

That being said, I did want to show a character whose masc-ness wasn’t about performance and trying to be the “special gay” who isn’t like those other gays, all in your face, etc.  That’s why Brad is there.  He’s just as butch as Hudson, but it’s not an entire identity for him.  He lets the guy he likes put nail polish on him because it makes that guy happy, he doesn’t care about what his partner is like, socially – even if he clearly likes a man with body hair.  And I think that’s the distinction.  Are you into a type of guy because of something physical only, or are you into a guy because of something social – some conception of things?  A lot of stuff can end up being either, so it’s really about YOU.  (and in case anyone is wondering, saying you’re not into a guy because they’re a certain race is always a racist social thing).  So yeah, I’d say to a guy “why?” and see what he says.  Especially since ‘masc’ is one of those terms that can mean different things to different people.  There, that was a long meandering way of getting to the answer.  But hey, long meandering way of getting to the answer is just another word for novel.

But I think on that note our word count here is probably becoming perhaps too long and meandering, so I just wanted to say thank you again for talking with me! It was a lot of fun and I’m so excited for people to get their hands on The Friend Scheme.  It’s a really fun, sexy novel.

Cale: No, thank you for talking to me! Camp is such a wonderful, important and fun book. I’m so happy teens (and everyone else) will be able to get it starting today!

Buy Camp: Bookshop | B&N | IndieBound | Amazon | Book Depository (UK Edition)

Preorder The Friend Scheme: Bookshop | B&N | IndieBound | Amazon | Book Depository

Hope and Happy Endings in YA Fiction: a Guest Post by I’ll See You Again Author CJ Bedell

Today we’re excited to welcome Chris Bedell to the site to discuss his YA contemporary novel, I’ll See You Again, out now from Deep Hearts! Here’s a little more about the book:

It’s the start of his senior year, and Cyrus should be worried about college applications, procrastinating on homework, and staying up past his bedtime. And he does, until his mother’s cancer returns.

To make matters worse, Nico Valentine—the person Cyrus hates most—insists on being his friend. Carefree, flirtatious, and spontaneous, Nico is everything Cyrus’s childhood never allowed him to be. When their English teacher offers Cyrus extra credit to tutor Nico, Cyrus knows he shouldn’t accept. He could use the distraction, though.

A fling soon ensues, and Cyrus realizes they have more in common than he thought. What is more, Nico is the first person who seems to get him and who is there no matter what. But, if Cyrus wants his romance with Nico to turn into something real, he’ll have to do something he’s never done before—be vulnerable with another person.

Buy it: Amazon | B&N

***

And here’s the guest post!

***

(Warning: The following blog post contains spoilers from the YA Contemporary novel I’LL SEE YOU AGAIN)

Hope is a controversial issue in YA literature (and even pop culture in general). On the one hand, people argue YA literature is fiction. So, there’s no harm in having a happy ending. On the other hand, some will argue a YA book might seem unrealistic if an ending is too happy. And the issue of happy endings is something I debated while writing my YA Contemporary novel I’LL SEE YOU AGAIN.

My main character, Cyrus, goes through a lot in the book. His mother has a cancer relapse, and ultimately dies. Cyrus also has his relationship with Nico, which becomes tumultuous towards the end of the book.

Chapter 23 (the book’s second to last chapter) takes place on graduation. Cyrus skips graduation, and reconciles with Nico for that one night. Cyrus wakes up the next morning to find Nico didn’t stay the night. Nico ended things with him on a Post-it note. Some people might argue the book could’ve concluded with that. Cyrus and Nico reconnected very briefly, yet their second breakup reinforces how some relationships don’t always last.

I couldn’t let the book end with the morning after graduation when Cyrus discovers the Post-it note, though. Doing so would’ve been cruel. The arc of Cyrus and Nico’s begins with the book’s first chapter. So, readers deserve a payoff. Cyrus also deserves happiness beyond his writing ambitions, friends, and family. Nico is the one person who understands Cyrus the most despite their opposite personalities. Nico and Cyrus both like to write, had fathers who abandoned them, and had mothers who died of cancer.

Chapter 24 (the book’s last chapter) therefore pushes the novel’s plot forward about nine months. It’s the following March after graduation. Nico and Cyrus are both back in town for Spring Break, and they eventually reconcile.

To me, offering hope is important in YA literature. Something cathartic exists from seeing Cyrus get a happy ending after struggling so much. A general overlap exists with real life—some readers might be grappling with serious problems. And they deserve to know life gets better no matter how trite the sentiment sounds. People are more than their romantic relationship, but being Nico makes Cyrus happy. It’s only human, after all. Most people wanna feel loved and accepted.

Also, I offer realism in a less jarring way. If I wanted to make the book unbelievably happy, then I would’ve had Chapter 24 also mention Cyrus getting a career break with his writing. But I didn’t. Not because that’ll never happen for Cyrus—it will. But because readers don’t need the entirety of Cyrus’s life story to know he’ll be happy. Cyrus is just like most people. Taking life one day at a time. And that’s enough. If Cyrus survived his mother’s death and reconciled with Nico, then he can handle anything.

***

Chris Bedell’s previous publishing credits include Thought Catalog, Entropy Magazine, Chicago Literati, and Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, among others. His debut YA Fantasy novel IN THE NAME OF MAGIC was published by NineStar Press in 2018. Chris’s 2019 novels include his NA Thriller BURNING BRIDGES (BLKDOG Publishing), YA Paranormal Romance DEATHLY DESIRES (DEEP HEARTS YA), and YA Thriller COUSIN DEAREST (BLKDOG Publishing). His other 2020 novels include his YA Thriller I KNOW WHERE THE BODIES ARE BURIED (BLKDOG Publishing), YA Thriller BETWEEN THE LOVE AND MURDER (Between The Lines Publishing), and YA Sci-fi DYING BEFORE LIVING (Deep Hearts YA). Chris also graduated with a BA in Creative Writing from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 2016.

Fave Fave: M/M Romances with Black MCs

Work for It by Talia Hibbert

American Dreamer by Adriana Herrera

Bang & Burn by Katrina Jackson

His Convenient Husband by Robin Covington

Kitten by Jack Harbon

Bonus: These are all adult, but in YA, definitely check out By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery, The Secrets of Eden by Brandon Goode, and How to Be Remy Cameron by Julian Winters!

Double Bonus: Coming up in May, Meet Cute Club by Jack Harbon!

14 Romance eBooks Under $5!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Her Royal Highness by Rachel Hawkins (bi/lesbian f/f YA, $1.99)

Caroline’s Heart by Austin Chant (trans m/f paranormal, $1.99)

The Craft of Love by EE Ottoman (trans m/f historical, $1.99)

Mangos and Mistletoe by Adriana Herrera (f/f, $2.99)

How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake (bi/lesbian f/f YA, $2.99)

Out on Good Behavior by Dahlia Adler (pan/lesbian f/f NA, $3.99)

Work for It by Talia Hibbert (m/m, $3.99)

Heart and Hand by Rebel Carter (m/m/f historical, $3.99)

Proper English by KJ Charles (f/f historical, $3.99)

Xeni by Rebekah Weatherspoon (bi/bi m/f, $4.99)

Alex in Wonderland by Simon James Green (m/m YA, $4.99)

Lord of the Last Heartbeat by May Peterson (m/nb fantasy, $4.99)

Daddy by Jack Harbon (m/m, $4.99)

Christmas Inn Maine by Chelsea M. Cameron, (f/nb, $4.99)

Links are Amazon affiliate, earning a percentage of income for the site.

Fave Five: LGBTQ Takes on Cinderella

Sometime After Midnight by L. Philips

The Secrets of Eden by Brandon Goode

Cinders by Cara Malone

Cinder Ella by S.T. Lynn

Dithered Hearts by Chace Verity

Bonus: Coming up in July, Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron

 

Exclusive Cover Reveal: Havesskadi by Ava Kelly

Very excited to have on the site today the cover reveal for the rerelease of Havesskadi by Ava Kelly, an asexual m/m fantasy (and winner of the Rainbow Book Award for Best Asexual Debut Book) which was originally published by the dearly departed LT3 press and has found a new home at Ninestar Press! The new version comes out on the 24th of this month and kicks off the Dragon Souls series, and here’s a little more about it!

The red dragon is hunting her own. Up in the icy peaks of the northern mountains, Orsie Havesskadi spends his days hiding from her, but eventually he is found and his dragon magic stolen. Cursed to wander the lands as a mortal unless he recovers his magic before twenty-four rising crescents have passed, Orsie embarks on an arduous journey. Spurred by the whispers in his mind, his quest takes him to a castle hidden deep in a forest.

Arkeva Flitz, a skilled garrison archer, discovers an abandoned castle in the woods. Trapped there, he spends his days with his two companions, one cruel, the other soothing. One day, a young man arrives at his gates, and soon they are confined by heavy snowfalls and in danger from what slumbers in the shadows of the castle.

And here’s the striking new cover, by none other than Natasha Snow!

Preorder it!

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Ava Kelly is an engineer with a deep passion for stories. Whether reading, watching, or writing them, Ava has always been surrounded by tales of all genres. Their goal is to bring more stories to life, especially those of friendship and compassion, those dedicated to trope subversion, those that give the void a voice, and those that spawn worlds of their own. Their publication history includes fantasy and science fiction short stories, novelettes, and the award-winning novel Havesskadi. Among their latest publications, Erebus is a sci-fi slipstream short story in Selene Quarterly, and Peripheric Synthesized is a sci-fi flash piece in Sci Phi Journal.